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Aluminum cargo trailer
#1
I know metal sweats.  Got that.

My question: If you got an aluminum cargo trailer, covered the outside with wood shingles (with an air space in between), and then did the same inside, but included insulation, would it still sweat?
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#2
Just insulating the inside should be all that is necessary. You would get condensation on any single-pane windows tho.
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  • CatPerson (11-04-2019)
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#3
From dampness caused by rain, heat/cold differences, as well as breathing/cooking..
Any moisture that is trapped, be it outside between metal and wood shingles or inside between metal and insulation, will need to be vented. That is if you want the condensation gone.

Venting a dead air space is necessary because the moisture/condensation trapped will grow mold. Unless you have created an envelope with no doors or windows and a way to breathe outside air through a tube. Course then you will have built a submarine and be wearing a ventilator.

It's a physics thing.
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  • heron (11-05-2019)
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#4
Go to the store and try lifting the amount of shingles + etc. you plan to use........

Insulate the inside , add something like FRP or thin plywood to cover.
(Moisture has a hard time condensing on a surface it can't get to.)
stay tuned 
popeye


 Weirdo Overlord : FMS Fleet Ops , Awards , Badges ,  aka Tamerlane the Impaler Mod.
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  • CatPerson (11-04-2019), heron (11-05-2019)
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#5
(11-04-2019, 06:41 AM)Matlock Wrote: Any moisture that is trapped, be it outside between metal and wood shingles or inside bedddtween metal and insulation, will need to be vented. That is if you want the condensation gone. 

So, how are commercially-made travel trailers vented?  Or are they?
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