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RV sales topped 500,000 in 2017
#1
Get ready for things to get a lot more crowded:

http://rvtravel.com/official-rv-shipment...f-million/[URL][/URL]
monkeyfoot
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  • Ballenxj (02-10-2018)
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#2
(02-10-2018, 10:39 AM)Cammalu Wrote: Get ready for things to get a lot more crowded:

http://rvtravel.com/official-rv-shipment...f-million/
Interesting, Lets do a little math here. The United States has roughly 300 million people right? Let's take that figure and divide by the 500 thousand figure in that article. It works out to be 600 times that a half a million goes into the total population, so 1/600th? Granted, that does not include the people that already own RV's, but people inherently buy them, use them a few times, then the RV lives in the driveway for most of the rest of it's life.
 The moral of my story here is that I'm not overly concerned yet, and will probably have none for the rest of my life. I hope that made sense?   Wink
 Now those dirty van dwellers may be a whole different story.  Tongue
 The Captain and Crew Finally got their stuff together. 
 Now if they can only remember where they put it.   Rolleyes
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#3
the baby boomers are retiring and there are a lot of them
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#4
I don't worry about too much competition for camping spots. Many of us here on this and some other forums do not stay in regular "campgrounds". Most RVs are not set up for any extended time off the grid. In the last decade or so, though, I have spent a fair amount of time in Natl Forest, state and county campgrounds. Except for weekends, I've not seen one park filled up with campers. I assume most of the new RVers will be weekend warriars, going home on Monday to go back to work. They now have to pay for their RV in addition to th their house or rent.

I've been camping since the early 70s. Maybe I'm imagining it, but it seems like in the last decade or so, that there are less tweens and teens camping. All I can think is that they are not willing to part with their games and social media for any length of time. I don't know how that bodes for our usage of public lands.
Ted
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#5
(02-10-2018, 03:39 PM)TedOnWalkabout Wrote:  Most RVs are not set up for any extended time off the grid. 

This. As soon as you start seeing a new type of RV that's set up for off-grid boondocking, then you'll know there's pressure to really get out there. 

Anybody seen a movement in that direction? Sure expedition vehicles are out there, but they're so damned expensive sales volumes won't amount to much. I would think there is some movement in custom build shops for off-grid vans, but that's still not mainstream.
YARC : Drunk in the Mud/Keeper of the Dingy/Ears [Image: L3000.gif]/Potluck Contributions Restricted
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#6
Quite a few of the new rigs come wired for solar. In fact almost every one I looked at had a inlet plug. 

Tomorrow the rig gets sold, or becomes 
PLAN B. 

There are more units in use than you think. 

This lifestyle has been around forever. The RV Musiem in Elkhart had 100 year old motorized units.
Compared to parenting, Cat herding is less complicated 
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#7
You gotta wonder what the statistic is on the other end too. How many motorhomes left the equation....to the wrecking yard, retired to a yard or driveway for the rest of it's life, etc.
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  • TWIH (02-12-2018)
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#8
Even if an RV is "set up" for boondocking, most newbies will not be able to go far afield for long. Lots of solar is great. Propane will last a long time for multiple purposes. But, most people need their shower every other day. They use water like it is free. It may be, but you have to carry the grey water and black water and dump when full-whether you want to or not. I was reading an article where the writer was patting herself on the back because they could go 5-6 days between dumps.

Our last go around, two of us went 24 days between dumping. We had room left, but we dumped when it was convenient. We're on day 15 with our tanks right now. I can wash dishes generously with a liter or two of water. I haven't washed my hair in a week (but when I do, I wash it at my son's apartment or a gym). I do drink bottled water, though.

Yep, how many of these new RVers will be willing to modify their water usage lifestyle? For me, my blackwater tank is the limit. When I'm on my own, I daresay that I should be able to last about two months on my fresh/grey/black water tanks. (45/45/45 gallons). Yes, you can say that I could dispose of excretions elsewhere, but John Q.Public wants to sit on the toilet in his own RV. As I do. People buy RVs so that they have all the comforts of home.

Nah, there may be less room available at campgrounds with all the new RVers, but longer term boondocking will not be super popular. Unless we could all hire a roving honey wagon.
Ted

(A somewhat unrelated, but interesting tidbit-I remember paying $0.35 a gallon for fresh water for our sailboat tanks in the early 1970s in the Bahamas)
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#9
(02-10-2018, 06:33 PM)Putts Wrote: This. As soon as you start seeing a new type of RV that's set up for off-grid boondocking, then you'll know there's pressure to really get out there. 

Anybody seen a movement in that direction? Sure expedition vehicles are out there, but they're so damned expensive sales volumes won't amount to much. I would think there is some movement in custom build shops for off-grid vans, but that's still not mainstream.

Roadtrek came out an electric one 2 or 3 years ago.  No propane, large battery bank, generator that I believe could charge the batteries in 1/2 an hour and solar panels.  Most will not be interested in the price.  MSRP Starting at $158,829 usd
http://www.roadtrek.com/models/e-trek
I don't know if they still have a 4X4 option.
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#10
Expedition vehicles are just expensive toys. People who can afford a big house AND an expensive rig aren't going to live in the rigs full-time, or even half-time.

Most young people don't know how to do anything but turn their electronics on and off. Many of them can't change a tire or replace a battery, they have no idea how to wash dishes without a dishwashter, and they waste a lot of stuff (like water) because they think it's free. I know a young guy (about 26 now), who was handed cash for anything he wanted for his entire upbringing. He can't hold a job for very long because his employers want him to actually work, instead of texting. His parents finally kicked him out, so he went to his adoring grandmother, and she let him live at her place (rent-free, of course). When she didn't pay her bills ($4,500 monthly income), the bank forclosed on the house, and the young guy was forced out (by police). Since then, I've heard from the neighbors that he has been living with a series of friends, but he refuses to pay them rent, so they say goodbye. If he shows up on NF land (no BLM land in W. WA), it will be in a cheap tent.
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