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Another thread that involves hospice...
#11
I travelled overland from Thailand into Cambodia back three years ago. Did the big tourist sights and backpacked all over. Went to the killing fields memorial and spoke with some older monks, as we had monks from Thailand with us. Very strange energy in the place. Spent a month in the country getting to know the people and culture and that event still shadows the society today in many many ways.
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#12
For generations to come I'd think.
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#13
(12-31-2017, 03:16 PM)Scott7022 Wrote: I travelled overland from Thailand into Cambodia back three years ago. Did the big tourist sights and backpacked all over. Went to the killing fields memorial and spoke with some older monks, as we had monks from Thailand with us. Very strange energy in the place. Spent a month in the country getting to know the people and culture and that event still shadows the society today in many many ways.

My fiance's grandfather was a monk. In previous wars, monks were always spared. It was an unspoken agreement similar to the Geneva Conventions. Monks and temples were spared out of mutual respect for spirituality. Khmer Rouge broke that for the first time--in fact monks were specifically targeted--and it has remained broken ever since.

One of the reasons Khmer Rouge casts such a long shadow on society is because it wasn't an invading force coming for you....it was your own neighbors turning on you. Khmer Rouge groups would spring up randomly in villages so that you never knew who you could trust. After it was supposedly over, Khmer Rouge terrorists would still spring up. And then even after most of THAT had died down (not sure it's completely gone even now, my fiance's family still hears rumors) they're still afraid to speak up about it, because the person who killed your family is now back to being your neighbor again.

Last I heard Khmer Rouge is not taught in Cambodian schools, and since many are afraid to talk about it there are a lot of the younger generations doubting it actually happened.

There is some happy news that I came across in my research, however, that was especially touching to my fiance. The Sleuk Rith Institute is a building in the works that will eventually house a museum, research library, and genocide education center. The architecture is gorgeous, and according to this article "The institute will be built inside a high school compound once used by the Khmer Rouge as a correction center." The intent it's being built on is "memory, justice, and healing."

When my fiance and I watched the video of what it's ultimately supposed to look like, along with reading of how it will be used, he was stunned. After a long silence he said, "This is going to be really good for the Cambodian people." When I asked him to elaborate, he continued, "Well the people there are so poor, and so...dejected. This would give them hope."

And then I read aloud to him this quote from the website:
Quote:The Institute's design motif, utilizing a nimble architectural framework that parodies light, fertility, and natural materials, soars upward into the light to convey aspiration in place of dejection, hope in place of remorse, pride in place of shame.

He was quiet for a long time. And then he thanked me for caring. And I was like "Of course I care!" He said most people don't.

Thank you all for caring.
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#14
I hope this edifice and all it stands for gives your fiancé and family a little peace and hope. And thank you for caring for them. A great gift.
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#15
We must care, learn, and support people caught in these atrocities in order not to repeat them in our society or allow them to be repeated in others. It is like my beloved pygmies. They were slaughtered like dogs and while the world may know about the Tutsi and Hutu genocide in Rwanda the pygmies remain forgotten. Well, not the ones that fought with Samael the pale or he who glows at night.

No truth and reconciliation or museum. But they are a strong people and have bounced back.

Nice to see good things happening in Cambodia
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#16
So much has happened, and continues to happen in Africa. At best it's ignored; at worst it's enabled, encouraged. We, and much of the rest of the world, bear so much blame. Not terribly unusual, I guess.
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#17
(01-01-2018, 11:44 PM)Scott7022 Wrote: We must care, learn, and support people caught in these atrocities in order not to repeat them in our society or allow them to be repeated in others. It is like my beloved pygmies. They were slaughtered like dogs and while the world may know about the Tutsi and Hutu genocide in Rwanda the pygmies remain forgotten. Well, not the ones that fought with Samael the pale or he who glows at night.

No truth and reconciliation or museum. But they are a strong people and have bounced back.

I'm so sorry, Scott. Which area were the pygmies you knew in?

(01-02-2018, 06:50 AM)heron Wrote: So much has happened, and continues to happen in Africa. At best it's ignored; at worst it's enabled, encouraged. We, and much of the rest of the world, bear so much blame. Not terribly unusual, I guess.

I lived in the northwest area of Cameroon, Africa near the Nigerian border from the ages of 5-9 years old (1994-1999). At the time it was listed as one of the top 10 most corrupt countries in the world, and our experiences there reflected that. However currently it has become so bad that even westerners who have lived there for decades are afraid to speak out about what's happening and getting out of there. The government has been issuing internet blackouts and even no cell coverage to try to keep protests down. A bunch of protesters were shot down during "warning shots" and reporters are being targeted. The city I most brightly remember had its streets completely empty, enforced by the military. Some are already calling it a genocide, and while I think that's premature, it's clear the government wants its anglophone citizens to disappear.

My one comfort is that the villagers are probably safe from it...though out there only 1 in 10 babies born live to see adulthood, and even then are significantly malnourished at that. (Due to a previous war, they ended up in a situation where there were too many people in a small area and all large game in the area was quickly hunted to extinction; now there is hardly any protein available.)
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#18
I left Rwanda with a group of about 1000. We travelled across Africa losing women and children at GOOD refuge camps or villages willing to take a few extra mouths if we could provide headmen with "gifts". We had some provisions and the rest we upgraded along the way. We got 200 back to traditional areas in the Congo (Kinshasha) and made two villages. I get frequent updates and pictures from Canadian Staff. They have schools, and clinics and even a couple of small companies. I love them so much. The experience almost destroyed me, it did destroy parts of me. Yet, the outcome saved what was left of my humanity. One day I will return and sit around the big fire and tell the long walk story, show the glowing tattoos, and keep the history alive in the classical spoken tradition of storytelling.
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