Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Brakes, what's too hot?
#1
I have my E450 box truck loaded to just under max weight of 14,400 lbs ...I'm around 13,600 I think. 
I put new pads on the rear dualies awhile back...didn't know til then that it was two brake pads per side. Anyway, I've never driven a truck like this far, and I really don't know what "normal" is for brake heating.

I do know that long downhills can get them smokin' hot and that it doesn't seem to take a whole lot to get them to where I can smell them after getting out.

Maybe this is just normal for a vehicle this size..?  At what point is there a problem? With an automatic tranny, should I consider downshifting...I'm worried that wouldn't be good for the tranny?

TIA  Smile
Reply
#2
It sounds like time to check the pads. Perhaps have a shop do it. There are little details that should be looked at. Turning the drums. Checking the lines. I have seen tiny parts cause failure. 

Unless you are 100% sure of what you are doing, it is worth paying for a professional to make sure that your vehicle stops every time.
Compared to parenting, Cat herding is less complicated 
[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to GotSmart for this post:
  • BradKW (07-13-2018)
Reply
#3
(07-12-2018, 07:29 PM)GotSmart Wrote: It sounds like time to check the pads. Perhaps have a shop do it. There are little details that should be looked at. Turning the drums. Checking the lines. I have seen tiny parts cause failure. 

Unless you are 100% sure of what you are doing, it is worth paying for a professional to make sure that your vehicle stops every time.

I drove a 20’ UHaul for a friend last year, it was based on the E450, it was pretty full, brakes were never hot, and I went down passes (of course with the Tow Haul transmission I barely used them but still).  Brakes shouldn't get more than “warm” to the touch in regular use.

Yes it’s subjective but “warm” is warm and “hot” is hot, except for the other sex looks when judged by multiple people...  Big Grin
They say when you get older two things happen, one is you lose your memory and the other, I forget.

Organized people are simply too lazy to search for stuff.
[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to TWIH for this post:
  • BradKW (07-13-2018)
Reply
#4
when your brakes get hot you can definitely smell them and will feel a great loss of performance,your transmission is important to go down the road,your brakes are important to keep you alive,definitely shift out of overdrive going down or up a hill,i have no issue manually shifting an automatic,do it often out in the woods hauling a load,the trans cant see the hill but i can and get in the right gear for it
Change the forum theme-bottom right
yarc t-shirts
yarc stickers pirate edition
[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to Blacktank for this post:
  • BradKW (07-13-2018)
Reply
#5
remember your e-brake works off a cable so if both of your hydraulic(front-rear two systems married together)fail you still can get stopped
Change the forum theme-bottom right
yarc t-shirts
yarc stickers pirate edition
Reply
#6
(07-12-2018, 06:09 PM)BradKW Wrote: I have my ... loaded to just under max weight

I do know that long downhills can get them smokin' hot and that it doesn't seem to take a whole lot to get them to where I can smell them after getting out.

should I consider downshifting...I'm worried that wouldn't be good for the tranny?
So the brakes are smoking and you're worried about using the gears they provided on the transmission?

You're joking, right?
Sometimes dweller in 237k miles '07 Grand C-van w/ a solar powered fridge and not much else
Reply
#7
The proper way to use your brakes on long grades is important. Do not ride the brakes down the hill. To slow down use the brakes firmly and let off when you get down to the speed you want. This method allows the brakes to cool until you need them again.

There is a possibility that something is not right on your rig. It should be checked.

Also, there are brake pads and there are brake pads. Cheap pads will ruin rotors. Spend the money for high quality pads.
[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to ratfink56 for this post:
  • BradKW (07-13-2018)
Reply
#8
(07-13-2018, 04:07 AM)ratfink56 Wrote: The proper way to use your brakes on long grades is important. Do not ride the brakes down the hill. To slow down use the brakes firmly and let off when you get down to the speed you want. This method allows the brakes to cool until you need them again.

According to Schneider (big orange trailers) that is called the stab braking technique.  And yes, the proper way to come down a steep hill with a heavy load.  I wonder if an engine brake system can be installed on smaller tow vehicles.
MORATTA LESSRATTA  OFFICIAL YARC

[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to Motrukdriver for this post:
  • BradKW (07-13-2018)
Reply
#9
(07-13-2018, 03:55 AM)MN C Van Wrote:
(07-12-2018, 06:09 PM)BradKW Wrote: I have my ... loaded to just under max weight

I do know that long downhills can get them smokin' hot and that it doesn't seem to take a whole lot to get them to where I can smell them after getting out.

should I consider downshifting...I'm worried that wouldn't be good for the tranny?
So the brakes are smoking and you're worried about using the gears they provided on the transmission?

You're joking, right?

I am concerned that downshifting to #2 while doing 50+ downhill might cause might cause wear or damage to the transmission, which is a bit more expensive than brakes. This does not strike me as a ridiculous concern....
[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to BradKW for this post:
  • Texjbird (07-13-2018)
Reply
#10
(07-12-2018, 06:09 PM)BradKW Wrote: I have my E450 box truck loaded to just under max weight of 14,400 lbs ...I'm around 13,600 I think. 
I put new pads on the rear dualies awhile back...didn't know til then that it was two brake pads per side. Anyway, I've never driven a truck like this far, and I really don't know what "normal" is for brake heating.

I do know that long downhills can get them smokin' hot and that it doesn't seem to take a whole lot to get them to where I can smell them after getting out.

Maybe this is just normal for a vehicle this size..?  At what point is there a problem? With an automatic tranny, should I consider downshifting...I'm worried that wouldn't be good for the tranny?

TIA  Smile

If you can smell the brakes heating up (smokin hot is a term to use for women, not brakes!) you are over-working them, and that causes brake-fade and drum brakes are slow to cool off when over-heated. You can end up with useless brakes, and that will be BAD.

So, when in doubt, slow down with brakes, then DOWNSHIFT! (don't over-rev the engine tho) 

Yes, when cresting a hill before a steep descent, slow down, and downshift. With a truck, there is a rate of descent called 'control speed' which means that the engine compression and choice of transmission ratio will allow the vehicle to travel downhill at a constant speed, more or less, and only having to apply the brakes intermittently. This speed might be 20-35 mph. This will keep the brakes cool and ready to use when needed.

Early in truck driver training, we are taught that we should never descend a grade in a higher gear than it took to climb the grade.
Wondering about Wandering.
[-] The following 1 user says Thank You to tx2sturgis for this post:
  • BradKW (07-13-2018)
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)