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Piggyback spade connector
#1
I got ahead of myself when I ran 10 Gauge wire to the other side of the truck for a dual USB and Ciggy outlet. Got all creative and drilled out a medium size 120V gray aluminum junction box so the blue sea ciggy and USB outlets would mount inside and ran the 10 gauge to that box. A nice clean install.

Then I realized I needed to jump from both spade terminals, positive to positive, neg to neg from the 10 gauge wire. The only thing I've found that looks like it will work ok is a 10-12 awg female piggyback terminal. Anyone have another option?

   
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  • American Nomad Patriot (06-15-2018)
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#2
With 10 awg one cannot stuff two wires into the end of a yellow connector, without some destranding at that point.

2 wires into one crimp connector is certainly an option though, i'd just recommedn using Zip ties to old wires together so that they are not trying to pull the crimp apart if stressed adequately.

If one is good with a soldering gun one can remove the plastic insulation off such a connector, open up the barrell enough to accept 2 10 gauge wires, fold those arms over the two wires and then solder and heatshrink them.

One can also remove a section of wire insulation, and add a short length of 10AWG in the middle of that removed insulation splitting off off at 90 degrees, or whatever angle is required.

Liquid E tape is recommended on these types of splices as heatshrink cannot usually be used on them, and wrapping E tape will eventually have it unravel.

But E tape sticks amazingly well to cured liquid E tape. I have the Star brite marine version of liquid E tape and find it superior to other brands i have tried.

If room behind the USB outlet's spade terminals is a concern, then Flag terminals are much lower profile, but they pretty much require special crimpers and they are not cheap or easily available. and getting 2 strands of 10AWG into them will not be simple
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#3
"One can also remove a section of wire insulation, and add a short length of 10AWG in the middle of that removed insulation splitting off off at 90 degrees, or whatever angle is required."

^^^ this is the better option. 
Now to find some liquid e-tape. Is this similar to plastic dip that I used years ago on screwdriver shafts and needle-nose plier handles to avoid sparks inside live electric panels? Ok like 30 years ago... stuff came in colors if I remember correctly.
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  • American Nomad Patriot (06-15-2018)
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#4
Most hardware stores have liquid tape on the shelf.
Please don’t feed the trolls 
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  • American Nomad Patriot (06-15-2018)
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#5
I do not know is Plastidip is dielectric, but as GS said, liquid E tape is easily available. I saw some in Home depot.

The less time spent with the cap off, the better. Use multiple thin coats instead of globbing on one super thick coat.

If you soldered the splice to be covered, use some rubbing alcohol to remove the flux from the joint and surrounding wire insulation before applying the liquid E tape.

I prefer this brand over the others i have tried:

https://www.amazon.com/Star-Brite-Liquid...1+oz&psc=1

It is thinner and seems to cure faster to get more coats built up quickly, and makes less mess.
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  • American Nomad Patriot (06-15-2018)
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#6
A bit of advice for the next control box. Plastic irrigation boxes are not that expensive and not metal. You can pre fabricate it on a bench. I will have Camilla post pictures as my phone hates me. 

I don’t remember how many I have built. BLEEp’s was one of the largest with 10 separate switches.
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  • American Nomad Patriot (06-15-2018)
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#7
[Image: 06b5e1bf59c0725a0fb7eea4062369e7.jpg][Image: da65239c7292ea73c0e6360cec9ef1bc.jpg][Image: 43274b93baeee2c8c27710f86a86a3f0.jpg]
monkeyfoot
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  • American Nomad Patriot (06-15-2018)
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#8
^^^^ Is that the powerstation for a small city???
Sometimes dweller in 233k miles '07 Grand C-van w/ a solar powered fridge but not much else
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  • American Nomad Patriot (06-15-2018)
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#9
(06-14-2018, 06:30 PM)MN C Van Wrote: ^^^^ Is that the powerstation for a small city???

No, just a dedicated circuit for each component. Master control switches to make sure that things don’t go pop when connected. The green one was in my van. Right next to my recliner.
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#10
I really hate when things go pop... that's the sound of a bad day about to happen.
Traveling.  It leaves you speechless and then turns you into a storyteller.

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