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Housetrucker?
#1
It's not very often that a Wikipedia article could be described as a 'fun' read, but this one is:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Housetrucker

Not only does it seem (to me) to shed a positive light on the whole nomadic vehicle-dwelling lifestyle in New Zealand, but it reminds us that a vagabond lifestyle is fairly common and valued around the world, since ancient times. 

Well, except for maybe here in the USA, that is.

Dodgy
Wondering about Wandering.
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#2
To me it really feels natural , true, or even closer to earth in way being a nomad. I feel I have more control over my life and my quality of life.
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#3
Americans have always had it's share of nomads not only roaming the states but the world. I think the internet has just allowed us to be more aware of possibilities.
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#4
Certainly they have always existed....but many vehicle dwellers in the USA are disrespected or accosted within some political boundaries..and are generally viewed by the public at large, police, and the media, as a bit lower on the socio-economic scales. 

Result: the portion of van culture centered on 'stealth'.

Many newcomers to the forums here and elsewhere, relate concerns, and outright negativity, towards them by friends and relatives.

It seems that many digital-nomads are reluctant to even reveal to bosses and clients that they are 'house-less'...for fear of repercussions.
Wondering about Wandering.
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#5
I see it (van life/nomadic/etc. ) in the way that bikers used to be the "bad guys" . That was until so many people of started buying and riding motorcycles (harley types) . Then the general image of "bikers" turned more positive. Not saying there aren't bad people in any group. But just an example. Personally I don't plan to be stealth. I will be the one to promote/share the way I live. I'm not ashamed or insulted. I've noticed in my time on the road that no matter what TT I have had or what condition it is in...everyone was always nice to me as I was to them. My end goal is once I build mine I want to get a second rig built. Most likely just a high top van. Then when I come across that "one" person that really needs it and deserves it. I will give it to them.
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#6
Funny I always had a Nomadic spirit. When my childhood friends were buying the SS Chevelles I was rockng the Datsun P/U albeit with a ford 289 providing the power. I spent my earned cash to travel even when I was 15 16 and 17. Experiences over stuff has always been my motto. I did aquire a few things but not as much as my friends. A rolling rock gathers no moss, and all that. Then it was military and loads of exotic lands. When I returned to the civilized world the Real World didn't feel that real and spending close to a million for a hole in the sky to live in struck as odd as it did the first time my pygmy friend said the words. It wasn't right for me. So I did the sticks and bricks for a while and finished a life of regular 9 to 5 knowing the goal was to travel. In the past 6 years I have been in Canada or the USA for a total of 3 months. The rest of the time has been spent revisiting old exotic places or new ones. When I return it will be to the rig I want. To travel with it where I want as desire pulls me. Not much worry, and zero fear, enough exotic lands I think I'll travel near, to and with, those so dear.
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#7
I've always lived such an unconventional lifestyle that my entire family is used to it. I'm not sure there's much I could do that would surprise them.....other than maybe getting a 9 to 5 job and working and living in the same spot for the next 30 years.

So many people live their lives to match the expectations of the masses. That is insanity to me, so when someone tells me i'm crazy for doing something that's considered out of the norm, I just laugh on the inside and smile. Humans are herd animals though, heck even we looked for and found our similar herd.
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#8
(05-15-2018, 04:19 AM)Scott7022 Wrote: Funny I always had a Nomadic spirit. When my childhood friends were buying the SS Chevelles I was rockng the Datsun P/U albeit with a ford 289 providing the power. I spent my earned cash to travel even when I was 15 16 and 17. Experiences over stuff has always been my motto. I did aquire a few things but not as much as my friends. A rolling rock gathers no moss, and all that. Then it was military and loads of exotic lands. When I returned to the civilized world the Real World didn't feel that real and spending close to a million for a hole in the sky to live in struck as odd as it did the first time my pygmy friend said the words. It wasn't right for me. So I did the sticks and bricks for a while and finished a life of regular 9 to 5 knowing the goal was to travel. In the past 6 years I have been in Canada or the USA for a total of 3 months. The rest of the time has been spent revisiting old exotic places or new ones. When I return it will be to the rig I want. To travel with it where I want as desire pulls me. Not much worry, and zero fear, enough exotic lands I think I'll travel near, to and with, those so dear.

Scott, Is that a poem? Reads like it. <thumbs up>
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